Star Trek: Tirpitz


Acting Captain’s Log, Risa sector patrol

After returning from the Klingon neutral zone, the Tirpitz was contacted by Commander Sulu.  He ordered us to divert our course to the Risa sector.  Unfortunately, his orders were not for the crew to take some much-needed shore leave.  Several systems within the region help to supply important materials such as dilithium crystals and alloys needed for ship repairs and construction to the Federation.  Our assignment was to patrol the sector, and ensure that ongoing operations were not being disrupted.  

Attacked by the Gorn

Our first destination was the Donia system.  Over the past two weeks, three civilian vessels had been lost to assaults by Gorn ships.  Our orders were to clear the system of any Gorn presence and restore safety to the region’s shipping lanes.  As soon as we arrived in system, we came under attack.  We were able to turn back the initial assault, and began a patrol of the system  We encountered several formations of Gorn ships and were successful in fending them off.  We reported our encounters back to Starfleet command so that they had accurate knowledge of Gorn fleet size and movements within the region.  

Defending the Science Station

After dealing with the Gorn, we continued on to the Tazi system.  A geological science station had been constructed in the system to study the asteroid belts and rings in the that system and the surrounding systems.  When we arrived, we were hailed by the station’s commander.  The station’s sensors had picked up a number of Klingon ships in the planetary ring the station had been constructed in.  They were unable to determine exact numbers, due to interference from the rings themselves.  After contacting Starfleet command, we received orders to engage and destroy any Klingon ships found in the system.  We did encounter several Klingon patrols, likely scouts sent to determine if the Tazi system had any resources worth collecting.  With the Klingons turned back, we don’t expect further visits from the Empire, but we have advised Starfleet command to increase the defensive capabilities of the science station in light of the Klingon’s scouting party.  

Scanning for Decalithium

While in orbit of the science station, we received orders to investigate a possible discovery that had been made in the Koolhaas system.  Probes launched from the Tazi science station had detected the presence of decalithium in the asteroid rings surrounding one of the system’s planets.  Decalithium is a rare isotope which, when properly refined, can be made into a substance known as red matter.  Starfleet wanted the Tirpitz to determine if there was enough decalithium in the system to warrant the construction of mining facilities.  As we were scanning the first decalithium deposit we found in the system, we came under attack.  It soon became apparent that Klingon forces had also detected the presence of the rare isotope, and were determined to stake a claim to it themselves.  We appraised Starfleet command of our situation, and they ordered us to continue our survey of the system.  They also ordered us, due to the potential of using decalithium to create destructive red matter weapons, to eliminate any Klingon forces we encountered.  We did our best to complete our orders as given, but I’m uncertain if we were successful.  We engaged several Klingon patrols, but most of them we only detected when they lowered their cloaking shields to open fire on the Tirpitz.  We sent a report to Starfleet command with our findings, and expect that they will find enough reason to set up some sort of operation in the Koolhass system.  

Assaulting the Klingon facilities

Our final stop in the Risa sector was the Omar system.  The Tazi science station had launched probes to study the system, and had detected several deposits of dilithium crystals.  However, they had also detected several automated mining facilities.  The probes also registered the presence of Klingon ships, shortly before the probes were destroyed.  Our orders were to destroy the illegal mining facilities at all costs.  We did encounter some resistance, but we were able to complete the mission while taking only minimal damage.  With the system secured, we contacted Starfleet command for further orders.  

Out of Character

I think this is the first patrol mission that didn’t feature a non-combat ground mission in one of the systems the player needed to visit.  Everything involved space combat of some sort.  Considering the ground missions from previous patrols so far haven’t been all that complex, it’s not that big of a loss.  But when people are complaining that there’s not enough non-combat missions in the game, it’s very noticeable when your main source of them dries up. 

This set of missions also marks a shift in tactics for the npc Klingons.  Up until this point, it’s been like the Klingons have forgotten they have cloaking devices.  With a number of these missions, I saw Klingon ships not appearing until I got close enough to scan a mission objective.  There were also several occasions when after a Klingon ship had taken a bit of damage, it cloaked briefly to lose my targeting lock.  I think it better matches ship tactics we’ve seen Klingons use in the TV series before.   

I guess I should also note that Risa does actually exist in-game.  Players can enter the system, and beam down to a beach resort on the planet.  As far as I can tell, it just seems to be a place to socialize.  There’s no mission to prevent a weapon from the future from falling into criminal hands, or to prevent people from altering the planet’s weather patterns.  It doesn’t really need a mission I guess, but the option to send the player there in the future for some reason wouldn’t be bad thing in my opinion.  For now, Risa will be a nice place to send the Tirpitz crew for shore leave in a blog post if I ever need to take an extended break for personal reasons.

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